Sunday, May 6, 2018



CINCO DE MAYO CELEBRATIONS - A U.S. AMERICAN TRADITION

Growing up as someone of British Protestant descent on my father's side we like all others of our background would where orange on St. Patrick's Day in solidarity with the U.K. against the Irish Republican Army.  Back then St. Patrick's day was a day which split communities.  Today everyone celebrates it as just a fun day to wear green.  Times have changed for the better.

SO YESTERDAY, I called my sister to check on how things are going for this year's family journey to South Padre.  The number is growing.  But during the conversation she said she had to go because she was running late for a Cinco de Mayo party at my youngest brother's home.  

We have no Mexico blood in our Nicaraguan lineage.  But I can tell you, even the Irish celebrate Cinco de Mayo in NY. This is a good thing.

BUT I'M CONFUSED, at the border the message seems to be to the Mexicans your food, festivals and traditions are welcome, but you are not.

Among people I know, no one celebrated Cinco de Mayo yesterday.  Were there any street festivals in Brownsville, because I can tell you there were many in NY.

We still have a long way to go.

3 comments:

Anonymous said...

Cinco de Mayo it's a commercial party for Americans. It was commercialized in the 80's to sell more Corona beers. Almost no one in Mexico celebrates Cinco de Mayo; the city of Puebla where the battle occurred, they do parade, but that's just about it.



El Nuevo Director

BobbyWC said...

You are correct, but sadly all Holidays have become about the money and drinking. But if it brings diverse ethnic groups closer in understanding one another that is good.

Bobby WC

Anonymous said...

Edinburg and McAllen had cinco de mayo
celebrations at their main plazas with mariachis, music, food,
and traditional cultural activities. Harlingen had a small celebration.
A friend of mine attended and sent me pictures.
Brownsville only does the Herald's 4th of July parade, jazz festival, Christmas houses and beer fest.
Edinburg has had a tremendous success with DIA DE LOS MUERTOS at their museum. It is BEAUTIFUL! The only free activity for that here in Brownsville is a "Day of the Dead" altar by the Mexican consulate. It used to be that UTB-TSC had a Halloween bash around that time, but that stopped once it was just UTRGV.
I guess Brownsville has no Mexican or Latin American roots in its citizens or cultural knowledge is something the population has no interest (being ironic, ok)