Sunday, November 6, 2016


FORBES MAGAZINE PUSHES TECHNICAL TRAINING IN HIGH SCHOOL

For years the BV has taken the lead on this issue.  It has consistently fallen on deaf ears.

A highlight from the FORBES:

So what’s the harm in prepping kids for college? Won’t all students benefit from a high-level, four-year academic degree program? As it turns out, not really. For one thing, people have a huge and diverse range of different skills and learning styles. Not everyone is good at math, biology, history and other traditional subjects that characterize college-level work. Not everyone is fascinated by Greek mythology, or enamored with Victorian literature, or enraptured by classical music. Some students are mechanical; others are artistic. Some focus best in a lecture hall or classroom; still others learn best by doing, and would thrive in the studio, workshop or shop floor."

3 comments:

Anonymous said...

THAT IS TRUE, STUDENTS LEARN BEST BY DOING HANDS ON IN THE WORKSHOP.
CATE teacher !!

Anonymous said...

I went to Hanna High School in the late 70's. Back in those days, there were classes in auto-mechanics, A/C and refrigeration, woodshop, Vocational office education (VOE), Bilingual office Education (BOE) part of what used to be Distributive Education Clubs of America (DECA). I believe is now called (CATE)I even remember taking driver's ed for 1 credit. I learned how to drive around the Land of Lakes area and when the one credit course was over, the people from DPS would give us the written test in a classroom inside the school. I took typing, accounting and shorthand as a junior and was part of the DECA program. I graduated from high school and worked as a secretary at the old TSC. I worked full time and attended classes in the late afternoon and night. Then I moved to Pan American University until I graduated. I completed a Master's degree at UT Austin and returned to the RGV. My point is, many of my fellow classmates from high school followed the same path. Some of my male classmates that did not pursue a four year degree, went to TSC and enrolled in the Vocational-Technical division. Their high school training prepared many of them to become A/C and refrigeration technicians (some currently have their own company), others received their certifications and work as certified mechanics at local dealerships, others became plumers, construction contractors, carpenters. Most of all, they work in something they enjoy doing and make a decent living.

Anonymous said...

HANNA HIGH SCHOOL HAS THE BEST CATE PROGRAMS.
THANKS.