Wednesday, April 8, 2015




 
BROWNSVILLE'S ECONOMIC ENGINES

Request to the Readers:  Years ago a program called Front Page was created.  A five year old could build a web page.  I have now spent a year trying various free samples of web design programs and have yet to find one I can use.  I have watched endless videos of Dream Weaver and still cannot perform a basic function.  I do not lie - it took seconds to start building a massive web page using Front Page.  So on that front I surrender - these programs are not designed for the average Joe.

BUT HELP WITH A GRAPHIC

What I really wanted to do was design one graphic using these four pictures with the caption - 'THE ECONOMIC ENGINES WHICH WILL MOVE BROWNSVILLE FORWARD."  If anyone can do it for me - please forward to bobbywc58@yahoo.com Thanks

Again through this post the BV remains the only blog which consistently promotes Brownsville.

MOVING FORWARD

If you are incapable of compromise, and lack mediation skills, you will fail as an elected official.

Yes, I opposed Space X.  But now it is here so lets make the best of it.

THE WEIR DAM AND SPACE X

County Judge Pete Sepulveda has raised the issue of the weir dam again.  We need to stop thinking big.  We need to think of this in small steps.   Dam holds back water as much as it releases water.  We need to use federal and state resources to get the dam built now to hold back enough water to meet the needs of Space X.  Once the dam is built and Mexico sees its benefits it will be more likely to get on board to complete the process.  For now we can raise the water lever near downtown without infrastructure changes. 

In time the war in Mexico will end. If Mexico gets on board over time with infrastructure changes in the downtown area, in time we can have hotels overlooking the Rio Grande with a board walk along the river.  Using the need of the weir dam to aid Space X has the potential of turning into a major economic engine for Brownsville, while finally giving Brownsville a real water policy,

ELECTRICITY

I have defended the need for the Tenaska plant.  I deal in reality.  Brownsville has lost business because we do not generate enough electricity.  This is a fact whether you like it our not.  You either want economic development or you do not.

I respect those who want Brownsville to stay as it is.  But it is not their choice.   The people are demanding development and better paying jobs.  There is always the country for those who want to continue the small town life.  I am the first to say it has its advantages.

The BPUB does get an "F" in terms of educating the people about Tenaska and being transparent about the deal.  You will never hear me defend the BPUB on this issue. 

In the end our rates will be at the state average.  Yes, for some people it will hurt.  But you can be proactive. By making my home more energy efficient  my bill has actually come down as rates went up. 

People need to think long term.  A natural gas plant will stabilize our rates.  It will bring new industry once Brownsville proves it can handle the electricity needs of the new industry.  More and better paying jobs will more than make up for the 2 cent increase in kwh we are paying the BPUB to finance our part of Tenaska.

THE AIRPORT AND PORT

SpaceX is to bring us a 12,000 runway.  This will mean the largest cargo planes currently in service can land in Brownsville.  This means jobs.  Our airport is already set to receive perishable cargo from South America.  It is really just about Brownsville finding the leadership to make it happen.  It is not complex - we just do not have the leadership who understands the process.

I would hire Tony Garza to go meet with the trade representatives for each South American county exporting perishables via air cargo to the US and have him market Brownsville.  We can ship that cargo fast via rail, trucking, and boat.  Within 24 hours after clearing customs every item can be in a distribution warehouse in Texas.  Texas is a large market.  Our airport can handle more than the needs of Texas, but just getting enough air cargo for the Texas market is a start.  This is jobs - real jobs.

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