Sunday, February 17, 2013

Photo: Loma Blanca/San Roman Rd. northwest corner of Starr Co.
My second son, Chris
 
TONY ZAVALETA PRAISES COWARD SON, CHRIS

According to Tony Zavaleta this is a picture of his son Chris, after downing a deer. I want to be clear - I think controlled hunting seasons are actually humane. While I do not hunt, I am a willing consumer of deer meat. But I only eat the meat when earned by men or women, not eunuchs who know nothing about sportsmanship such as this pathetic young man.

What a man!! drop corn from a can, wait for the deer to eat it and then shoot the deer. Now I will tell you how my niece hunts deer and elk - she uses a bow and arrow on federal land. They camp out and walk and walk in the cold until they come along a deer or elk, naturally in the wild and then aim their arrow. My niece can teach this pathetic coward a thing or two about sportsmanship.

The fact Tony Zavaleta finds this something to be proud of speaks volumes about his character or lack of character. 

I truly believe Texas demeans itself and all hunters by continuing to allow for such a cowardly and unsportsman way of hunting.

It should shock no one that so many Texas men and women are too prissy to hunt like real hunters, and with the honor of true sportsmen and women.

7 comments:

Anonymous said...

Bow hunting may make the hunter feel good but I doubt the deer sees much in it. I think it is much more humane to shoot a baited deer. The animal can be lured in close to help ensure an accurate, killing shot and a quick death. An arrow shot animal rarely is an animal that dies instantly. In fact, a broad head is designed to cut as it traverses the animal’s body cavity so that, absent a heart shot, the deer bleeds to death. This could take a while and I don't think spending that time waiting to die with a fiberglass shaft piercing your body is much of a picnic. The chance of losing the deer is much greater, too. If the arrow is not well placed the process could take days. A well placed rifle shot will kill the animal immediately or at least immediately incapacitate it. Of course, a badly placed rifle shot will have the same effect as a badly placed arrow shot.
I don’t think much of trophy hunters either. By killeing the largest animal they can find they remove the best genes from the gene pool. High fence hunters might as well be hunting in a zoo. A big zoo but just because the cage is a big one it is still a cage.

BobbyWC said...

I appreciate how you phrased your response - it is the type response which makes the BV work

My issue was sportsmanship - there is none - period in this form of hunting - period - like you said it is a lot more of a challenge with a bow and also gives the deer or elk a fighting chance - I will bet the farm there are a lot more misses with a bow than a rifle while the poor deer is feeding

Also lead bullets present a hazard for the condors - not just from the entrails left behind by the hunters, but from deer who are only wounded, but die days later - so wounded deer buy arrows are not the only ones which suffer

http://cronkitenewsonline.com/2012/03/conservationists-nationwide-ban-on-lead-hunting-bullets-would-help-arizona/

I believe lead bullets have been banned in California

Bobby WC

Anonymous said...

Sick and tired of our city/EDC leaders spending our money wasteful. Can you believe our city leaders have given the governor $192,000 so he can travel lavishly around the world???? Check this out....http://www.chron.com/news/houston-texas/houston/article/Economic-development-group-promotes-Perry-and-4285269.php?t=1cf84ffda2

BobbyWC said...

I agree with your general point, but where is Brownsville or Cameron county mentioned in the article? Chamber of Commerce donations are a bit of a stretch

Bobby WC

Anonymous said...

Look at the bottom of the article. Money is being given by BEDC who gets sales tax from our city and not chamber.

BobbyWC said...

I am very sorry I missed that - you are correct and therefore will get a special post from a loyal readers watching out for Brownsville . You will see my second piece I am about to publish - I was really focus on editing it for legal issues and defamation so I guess I did not read the article well enough

Thanks for a great heads up to Brownsville

Bobby WC

Anonymous said...

" like you said it is a lot more of a challenge with a bow and also gives the deer or elk a fighting chance - I will bet the farm there are a lot more misses with a bow than a rifle while the poor deer is feeding"
You can be sure there are many more misses with a bow then a rifle and many more wounded animals that die a long slow death because of badly placed arrows. I was not supporting the challenge of bow hunting. I think it is cruel and should not be allowed. Most bow hunters I know, and I know a bunch of them, went to bow hunting after becoming bored with gun hunting. The challenge entertains the hunter but is just another way to torture animals, in my opinion. Let me add that I am not anti-hunting and I have killed deer. I just think that the animal must be killed humanely and not die of infection days after being wounded. And that is much more likely with an arrow shot deer. I wish I had a dollar for every time I have heard a hunter say they don't care if they kill anything or not. They are just there to be outdoors and enjoy the experience. I say if that is true, leave your gun home and take a pair of binoculars and/or a camera. But if you just have to kill something shoot a runt buck or a fat, over populated doe. And bait the animal in. Get it close enough so that you can make an easy, quick kill. Allow the best genes to stay in the population. That doe will be better eating, anyway.
And yes, there has been a problem in Southern California with condors ingesting bullit lead from lost or abandoned animals when they feed on the carrion. That is only a problem for condors in the mountains and canyons of the condor's very restricted range. The feds restrict the use of lead shotgun pellets in coastal areas because ducks were ingesting the lead bbs and were being poisoned (having no teeth, birds ingest small stones which remain in the gizzard and grind their food before it moves into the stomach.) Recently I read of an attempt to lift this ban.