Tuesday, February 3, 2009

STIMULUS OR FRAUD ON THE PEOPLE - YOU DECIDE

http://www.cnn.com/2009/POLITICS/02/02/gop.stimulus.worries/index.html

The above link provides a list of projects which the Republicans claim to not be stimulus, but pork. Pork is my friend. I know pork when I see it. A lot of this is pork.

When will Congress get it - never

I say if it oinks like a pig - it is pork - but then I could be wrong

2 comments:

Anonymous said...

Tarsia receives city’s payment

$26,139 in check scandal makes
February 3, 2009 - 7:56 PM
BY EMMA PEREZ-TREVIÑO
The Brownsville Herald
Joseph Tarsia finally received his payment from the city.

"Yes, with delayed action and some inconveniences, we received the final payment for our product from the City of Brownsville, Texas," Tarsia recently said in a written statement to The Brownsville Herald.

Tarsia, of Tarsia Technical Industries Inc. in Hauppauge, N.Y., referred to the $26,139 check that the city issued to his firm on Oct. 22.

Tarsia didn't receive it. Instead, it was deposited into Mayor Pat M. Ahumada Jr.'s bank account six days later on Oct. 28.

The Brownsville Police Department conducted an investigation into how this occurred and the results were submitted last week to Cameron County District Attorney Armando Villalobos for possible review by a grand jury.

The check to Tarsia was the second and final payment of a $55,278 purchase that the City Commission approved on Aug. 19 for a digital archive camera and scanning workstation for the Brownsville Public Library.

The city paid Tarsia half the cost when the purchase order was issued.

The inquiry began after Tarsia called the city asking for the second payment, city officials said.

"I have no clue to comment on anything else," Tarsia said.

Villalobos has declined to comment on the case or whether the case would be presented before a grand jury.

His office recently provided data regarding the grand juries in Cameron County, however.

Cameron County has three district courts that have grand juries: 103rd District Court, 107th District Court and the 197th District Court. The terms of the grand juries are six months, beginning in January and ending in June, except for the 103rd that lasts for seven months.

Each grand jury meets one time a month. The meeting dates are scheduled on the second, third and fourth Wednesday of the month. The schedule, however, can be changed with permission of the courts, the district attorney's office said.

A grand jury consists of 12 individuals who vote to determine if probable cause exists to believe that an offense occurred. It takes nine votes to enter what is called a true bill and return an indictment.

The police inquiry did not determine how the check, which the city finance department issued to the vendor, ended up in Ahumada's hands.

Asked about the possibility of administering polygraph tests to people who might have handled the check, City Manager Charlie Cabler said: "Who are we going to administer that test to? We don't have any idea how that check got to the mayor. Maybe it was done in a way that no one knows it happened."

Ahumada's attorney, John Blaylock, was unsure if lie-detector tests should be administered. "I leave that to them, (but) I find that polygraph tests are often a useful tool for law enforcement based on my experience."

Anonymous said...

I don't know, but if I become a Democrat, do I get to stop paying my taxes too?