Monday, October 13, 2008

REVITALIZING OUR OLDER NEIGHBORHOODS IS KEY TO BUILDING A STRONGER PROPERTY TAX BASE

I am trying to get away from BISD. Tomorrow I promise just a short update. For now I can say a nationally known pediatric specialist in SA has agree to see the child.

The old adage, first impression is everything needs to be taught to the Brownsville City Commission. This concept is complete lost on the Brownsville City Commission. Iowa is now officially a road hazard which should be avoided. You will damage your car if you hit the potholes.

Last week my brother was here looking for a retirement home for himself and his wife. They were also looking for a place for their youngest daughter and son-in-law. The son-in-law is a welder so work is plentiful. What is apparently clear while you drive through the neighborhoods is, there are no codes or they are not enforced. This lack of codes brings down property values which in turn bring down property tax revenues. This problem is not limited to Brownsville.

While in Port Isabel and Laguna Vista we saw property after property wherein the backyards were still under water. How is it possible builders got building permits fo residential properties in areas prone to flooding? Why are their no ordinances which mandate the builders raise the property above the flood level. The lack of drainage in these communities certainly does not help.

In Brownsville we saw neighborhood after neighborhood which looked like dumps. New communities with 6 foot chain linked fences in the front yard. In Dallas and Arlington I can tell you this is illegal. Trampolines in front yards do not help property values. But then, since the lots are so small the only place for a trampoline is the front yard. This all should be regulated by city ordinances. It is not.

Brownsville has no hopes of building a beautiful community with rising property values until such time as it passes and enforces cities ordinances which promote beautification of its neighborhoods. A second measure is raising the impact fee to $6,000.00. Right now, for the most part, only high dollar homes are being build. Medium and low income housing needs to come from revitalization of our older neighborhoods. Until we find a way to revitalize our older neighborhoods they will continue to go in the direction of dilapidated neighborhoods which in turn bring down property values. This helps no one.

2 comments:

Anonymous said...

Welcome to the Rio Grande Valley!
There is a reason places like Dallas and Arlington keep up with code enforcement!..it's the neighbors.
30 years ago the BCC prohibited chain link fences, rv's in the drive way, trucks on bricks in the front yards. It was because neighbors took pride in their homes, and there was alway a snitch in the hood who was the president of the HOA, and was quick to get on the phone and tell them to move that car. Those days are long gone. BCC looks like a chop shop! You have areas with 150k dollar homes, or what used to be vauled at 150k, and a couple of streets down you have 80k homes with 8 cars in the yard, lattice fence, and bright red paint on the trim. That doesn't help my house at all, but there is no organization, and people balk at the idea of starting one and contributing to a quarterly fee. You get what you pay for! ..and Brownsville doesn't like to pay for anything..Brownsville feels entitled! and that's the problem.

100 words or less

BobbyWC said...

"You get what you pay for! ..and Brownsville doesn't like to pay for anything..Brownsville feels entitled! and that's the problem."

Basically I believe you are right. But do not forget the many who actually do take pride in their communities.

I was talking to a realtor from SPI and we were joking about her being mostly Repub and me mostly Dem. She agreed that she fears the Repubs on social conservatism and I fear the Dems for promoting dependence and a sense of entitlement.

I suspect most Americans feel the way we do. In the end only the people can fix this problem.

Bobby WC